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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9732854, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9732854
Research Article

Long-Term Intake of Uncaria rhynchophylla Reduces S100B and RAGE Protein Levels in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures Rats

1School of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
2School of Post-Baccalaureate Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
3Ko Da Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd, Taoyuan 324, Taiwan
4Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
5Department of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40447, Taiwan
6Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
7Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
8Research Center for Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Ching-Liang Hsieh; wt.gro.humc.liam@heishlc

Received 30 November 2016; Revised 13 January 2017; Accepted 24 January 2017; Published 23 February 2017

Academic Editor: Kuttulebbai N. S. Sirajudeen

Copyright © 2017 Nou-Ying Tang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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