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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2018, Article ID 1054629, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1054629
Review Article

Analysis of the Registration Information on Interventions of Acupuncture and Moxibustion Trials in the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform

1Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China
2Postdoctoral Research Station, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China
3Evidence Based Medicine Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China
4The First Clinical Medical College of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China
5Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100700, China
6China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Baoyan Liu; moc.361@lanruojnayoab

Received 3 August 2017; Accepted 15 November 2017; Published 15 January 2018

Academic Editor: Caigan Du

Copyright © 2018 Yali Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. To analyze and compare the clinical registration information about acupuncture and moxibustion for intervention characteristics. Methods. Clinical trials from the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the World Health Organization in acupuncture and moxibustion were comprehensively collected from 2013 to 2015; data were independently screened and extracted by two retrievers, and relevant data involving either basic descriptions or intervention characteristics were analyzed. Results. 425 acupuncture and moxibustion registered clinical trials were included; 88.00% (374/425) were designed as controlled studies, among which 38.59% (164/425) had sham acupuncture as the control group. The most common diseases were pain-related at approximately 19.29% (82/425) of trials. Reports on the intervention information in these acupuncture and moxibustion clinical studies were not sufficiently presented; these reports included the reporting of names of points (39.8%), the method of needle stimulation (32.5%), needle type (29.6%), needle retention time (34.1%), the number of treatment sessions (22.4%), and the frequency and duration of treatment sessions (38.1%). Conclusion. The registration information for the clinical trials of acupuncture and moxibustion was quite low according to this investigational study. Steps should be taken to improve the quality of acupuncture and moxibustion registration information.