Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 1289125, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1289125
Research Article

Concurrent Use of Herbal and Orthodox Medicines among Residents of Tamale, Northern Ghana, Who Patronize Hospitals and Herbal Clinics

1Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana
2Department of Nursing, School of Allied Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana
3Department of Herbal Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Evans Paul Kwame Ameade; moc.oohay@hsepkos

Received 18 October 2017; Revised 10 January 2018; Accepted 6 February 2018; Published 19 March 2018

Academic Editor: Vincenzo De Feo

Copyright © 2018 Evans Paul Kwame Ameade et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. M. A. Kuhn, “Herbal remedies: drug-herb interactions.,” Critical Care Nurse, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 22–34, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. K. P. Osemene, A. A. Elujoba, and M. O. Ilori, “A comparative assessment of herbal and orthodox medicines in Nigeria,” Research Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 5, no. 5, pp. 280–285, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. M. F. Mahomoodally, “Traditional medicines in Africa: an appraisal of ten potent African medicinal plants,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2013, Article ID 617459, 14 pages, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. K. Chan and L. Cheung, Interactions between Chinese herbal medicinal products and orthodox drugs, CRC Press, 2000.
  5. P. A. G. M. De Smet, “The role of plant-derived drugs and herbal medicines in healthcare,” Drugs, vol. 54, no. 6, pp. 801–840, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. P. J. Houghton, “Synergy and polyvalence: paradigms to explain the activity of herbal products,” Evaluation of herbal medicinal products, pp. 85–94, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  7. World Health Organization. WHO traditional medicine strategy 2002-2005.
  8. S. Bent, “Herbal medicine in the United States: review of efficacy, safety, and regulation: grand Rounds at University of California, San Francisco Medical Center,” Journal of General Internal Medicine, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 854–859, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. A. Molassiotis, P. Fernandez-Ortega, D. Pud et al., “Use of complementary and alternative medicine in cancer patients: a European survey,” Annals of Oncology, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 655–663, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. L. Howell, K. Kochhar, R. M. Saywell Jr. et al., “Use of herbal remedies by Hispanic patients: do they inform their physician?” Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 566–578, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. K. Sekhri, S. Bhanwra, and R. Nandha, “Herbal products: a survey of students’ perception and knowledge about their medicinal use,” International Journal of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, vol. 2, no. 1, p. 71, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. E. P. K. Ameade, A. Amalba, G. K. Helegbe, and B. S. Mohammed, “Medical students' knowledge and attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine – A survey in Ghana,” Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 230–236, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. J. Neustadt, “Herb-drug interactions: What clinicians need to know?” Integrative Med, pp. 16–26, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  14. Asare BE. Developments made in herbal medicine practice in Ghana. [Internet] Modern Ghana. 2016, [cited 9 January, 2018]. Available from: https://www.modernghana.com/news/594410/developments-made-in-herbal-medicine-practice-in-ghana.html.
  15. P. A. MO, “Prevalence of concurrent use of herbal and synthetic medicines among outpatients in a mission hospital in Nigeria,” International Journal of Drug Development and Research, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  16. A. Djuv, O. G. Nilsen, and A. Steinsbekk, “The co-use of conventional drugs and herbs among patients in Norwegian general practice: a cross-sectional study,” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 13, article 295, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. C. B. Duru, K. C. Diwe, K. A. Uwakwe et al., “Combined Orthodox and Traditional Medicine Use among Households in Orlu, Imo State, Nigeria: Prevalence and Determinants,” World Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 5–11, 2016. View at Google Scholar
  18. K. B. Mustapha, R. A. Kirim, J. A. Ibrahim, P. U. Onuche, and M. T. Bakare-Odunola, “Perception of use of herbal and orthodox medicines in parts of Abuja: A pilot study,” Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science, vol. 6, no. 9, pp. 128–132, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. Ghana Statistical Service. 2010 Population and Housing Census. Summary of Final Results. Accra. 2012.
  20. J. A. Astin, “Why patients use alternative medicine: results of a national study,” Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 279, no. 19, pp. 1548–1553, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. A. Kilcoyne, P. Ambery, and D. O'Connor, Trade and production of herbal medicines and natural health products, vol. 3, Oxford University Press, ICS-UNIDO, Trieste, Italy, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  22. World Health Organization. WHO guidelines on safety monitoring of herbal medicines in pharmacovigilance systems. 2004. Geneva: World Health Organization. vii. [Internet]. 2015. [cited 26 January, 2017]. Available from: http://apps.who.int/medicinedocs/documents/s7148e/s7148e.pdf. Accessed 26 January 2017.
  23. N. Sahoo, P. Manchikanti, and S. Dey, “Herbal drugs: standards and regulation,” Fitoterapia, vol. 81, no. 6, pp. 462–471, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. F. N. Githinji, Utilisation of herbal products and concomitant use with conventional medicine in Githunguri Division, Kiambu County [Doctoral, thesis], Doctoral dissertation, Kenya, Doctoral dissertation.
  25. M. G. C. da Silva, M. C. F. Soares, and A. L. Muccillo-Baisch, “Self-medication in university students from the city of Rio Grande, Brazil,” BMC Public Health, vol. 12, article 339, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. Baidoo FA. Illegal peddling of drugs poses health risk. [Internet]. 2014 [cited 9 January, 2018]. Available from: https://www.graphic.com.gh/news/health/illegal-peddling-of-drugs-poses-health-risk.html.
  27. C. Anquez-Traxler, “The legal and regulatory framework of herbal medicinal products in the European Union: A focus on the traditional herbal medicines category,” Drug Information Journal, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 15–23, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus