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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2018, Article ID 1463579, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1463579
Research Article

Bioactivities of Traditional Medicinal Plants in Alexandria

1Floriculture, Ornamental Horticulture and Garden Design Department, Faculty of Agriculture (El-Shatby), Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
2Department of Geography, Environmental Management and Energy Studies, University of Johannesburg, APK Campus, 2006, South Africa
3Department of Pharmaceutical Botany, Medical College, Jagiellonian University, Ul. Medyczna 9, 30-688 Kraków, Poland
4Botany and Microbiology Department, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
5Timber Trees Research Department, Sabahia Horticulture Research Station, Horticulture Research Institute, Agriculture Research Center, Alexandria, Egypt
6Botany Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt
7Precision Agriculture Laboratory, Department of Pomology, Faculty of Agriculture (El-Shatby), Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt

Correspondence should be addressed to Hayssam M. Ali; as.ude.usk@nassahyah

Received 27 November 2017; Accepted 4 January 2018; Published 31 January 2018

Academic Editor: Letizia Angiolella

Copyright © 2018 Hosam O. Elansary et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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