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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2018, Article ID 1614793, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1614793
Research Article

Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of 80% Methanol Extract of Leonotis ocymifolia (Burm.f.) Iwarsson Leaves in Rodent Models

1Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
2Food, Medicine and Healthcare Administration and Control Authority of Ethiopia (FMHACA), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Correspondence should be addressed to Wondmagegn Tamiru; moc.liamg@mdnow2liam

Received 26 October 2017; Revised 7 December 2017; Accepted 18 December 2017; Published 20 February 2018

Academic Editor: Junji Xu

Copyright © 2018 Asnakech Alemu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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