Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 2598975, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2598975
Research Article

Electroacupuncture Alleviates Pain Responses and Inflammation in a Rat Model of Acute Gout Arthritis

1Department of Neurobiology and Acupuncture Research, The Third Clinical Medical College, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053, China
2Department of Laboratory and Equipment Administration, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053, China
3Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital and Yuying Children’s Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325027, China
4Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Science, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Guo-qing Zheng; moc.uhos@gnehz_qg, Jianqiao Fang; moc.361@2357oaiqnaijgnaf, and Boyi Liu; moc.liamxof@uil.iyob

Received 1 November 2017; Revised 27 January 2018; Accepted 11 February 2018; Published 19 March 2018

Academic Editor: Yuan Xu

Copyright © 2018 Wenxin Chai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. R. Terkeltaub, “Update on gout: new therapeutic strategies and options,” Nature Reviews Rheumatology, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 30–38, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. R. A. Terkeltaub, “Gout,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 349, no. 17, pp. 1647–1655, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. E. Roddy and M. Doherty, “Epidemiology of gout,” Arthritis Research & Therapy, vol. 12, no. 6, p. 223, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. A. Abhishek, E. Roddy, and M. Doherty, “Gout - a guide for the general and acute physicians,” Clinical Medicine, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 54–59, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. N. Dalbeth and D. O. Haskard, “Mechanisms of inflammation in gout,” Rheumatology, vol. 44, no. 9, pp. 1090–1096, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. W. Shim, J. Y. Jung, and S. S. Kim, “Effects of Electroacupuncture for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Article ID 3485875, 2016. View at Google Scholar
  7. R. Zhang, L. Lao, K. Ren, and B. M. Berman, “Mechanisms of acupuncture-electroacupuncture on persistent pain,” Anesthesiology, vol. 120, no. 2, pp. 482–503, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. T. Ye, Z. Du, Z. Li et al., “Repeated Electroacupuncture Persistently Elevates Adenosine and Ameliorates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2016, pp. 1–10, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. J.-Q. Fang, J.-Y. Du, Y. Liang, and J.-F. Fang, “Intervention of electroacupuncture on spinal p38 MAPK/ATF-2/VR-1 pathway in treating inflammatory pain induced by CFA in rats,” Molecular Pain, vol. 9, no. 1, article 13, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. J.-Y. Du, J.-Q. Fang, Y. Liang, and J.-F. Fang, “Electroacupuncture attenuates mechanical allodynia by suppressing the spinal JNK1/2 pathway in a rat model of inflammatory pain,” Brain Research Bulletin, vol. 108, pp. 27–36, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. L. T. Yen, C. L. Hsieh, H. C. Hsu, and Y. W. Lin, “Targeting ASIC3 for Relieving Mice Fibromyalgia Pain: Roles of Electroacupuncture, Opioid, and Adenosine,” Targeting ASIC3 for Relieving Mice Fibromyalgia Pain: Roles of Electroacupuncture, Opioid, and Adenosine, vol. 7:46663, 2017. View at Google Scholar
  12. H. Y. Liao, C. L. Hsieh, C. P. Huang, and Y. W. Lin, “Electroacupuncture Attenuates CFA-induced Inflammatory Pain by suppressing Nav1.8 through S100B, TRPV1, Opioid, and Adenosine Pathways in Mice,” Sci Rep, vol. 7:42531, 2017. View at Google Scholar
  13. B. Liu, H.-M. Wang, and F.-Y. Wang, “Observation on therapeutic effect of electroacupuncture combined with local blocking therapy on acute gouty arthritis,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 28, no. 9, pp. 659–661, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. J.-Y. Xie, L. Wang, Q.-X. Li, and X.-M. Li, “Study on mechanisms of electroacupuncture treatment of acute gouty arthritis,” Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion, vol. 27, no. 12, pp. 898–900, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. W. B. Lee, S. H. Woo, B.-I. Min, and S.-H. Cho, “Acupuncture for gouty arthritis: a concise report of a systematic and meta-analysis approach,” Rheumatology, vol. 52, no. 7, pp. 1225–1232, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. Z.-Q. Zhao, “Neural mechanism underlying acupuncture analgesia,” Progress in Neurobiology, vol. 85, no. 4, pp. 355–375, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. N. Goldman, M. Chen, T. Fujita et al., “Adenosine A1 receptors mediate local anti-nociceptive effects of acupuncture,” Nature Neuroscience, vol. 13, no. 7, pp. 883–888, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. J. S. Han, “Acupuncture: neuropeptide release produced by electrical stimulation of different frequencies,” Trends in Neurosciences, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 17–22, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. Y. Wang, R. Gehringer, S. A. Mousa, D. Hackel, and A. Brack, “CXCL10 controls inflammatory pain via opioid peptide-containing macrophages in electroacupuncture,” PLoS ONE, vol. 9, no. 4, Article ID e105841, 2014. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. Y. Wang, D. Hackel, F. Peng, and H. L. Rittner, “Long-term antinociception by electroacupuncture is mediated via peripheral opioid receptors in free-moving rats with inflammatory hyperalgesia,” European Journal of Pain, vol. 17, no. 10, pp. 1447–1457, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. R. Taguchi, T. Taguchi, and H. Kitakoji, “Involvement of peripheral opioid receptors in electroacupuncture analgesia for carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia,” Brain Research, vol. 1355, pp. 97–103, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. G. G. Zhang, C. Yu, W. Lee, L. Lao, K. Ren, and B. M. Berman, “Involvement of Peripheral Opioid Mechanisms in Electroacupuncture Analgesia,” Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, vol. 1, no. 5, pp. 365–371, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. T. Fujita, C. Feng, and T. Takano, “Presence of caffeine reversibly interferes with efficacy of acupuncture-induced analgesia,” Sci Rep, vol. 7, no. 1, p. 3397, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  24. Y. Tang, H.-Y. Yin, P. Rubini, and P. Illes, “Acupuncture-Induced Analgesia: a Neurobiological Basis in Purinergic Signaling,” The Neuroscientist, vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 563–578, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. T. J. Coderre and P. D. Wall, “Ankle joint urate arthritis (AJUA) in rats: an alternative animal model of arthritis to that produced by Freund's adjuvant,” PAIN, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 379–393, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. T. J. Coderre and P. D. Wall, “Ankle joint urate arthritis in rats provides a useful tool for the evaluation of analgesic and anti-arthritic agents,” Pharmacology Biochemistry & Behavior, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 461–466, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. C. R. Silva, S. M. Oliveira, C. Hoffmeister et al., “The role of kinin B1 receptor and the effect of angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibition on acute gout attacks in rodents,” Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 75, no. 1, pp. 260–268, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. X.-W. Dong, Y. Jia, S. X. Lu et al., “The antipsychotic drug, fluphenazine, effectively reverses mechanical allodynia in rat models of neuropathic pain,” Psychopharmacology, vol. 195, no. 4, pp. 559–568, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. W. J. Dixon, “Efficient analysis of experimental observations,” Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology, vol. 20, pp. 441–462, 1980. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. S. R. Chaplan, F. W. Bach, J. W. Pogrel, J. M. Chung, and T. L. Yaksh, “Quantitative assessment of tactile allodynia in the rat paw,” Journal of Neuroscience Methods, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 55–63, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. B. Liu, J. Escalera, S. Balakrishna et al., “TRPA1 controls inflammation and pruritogen responses in allergic contact dermatitis,” The FASEB Journal, vol. 27, no. 9, pp. 3549–3563, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. B. Liu, Y. Tai, S. Achanta et al., “IL-33/ST2 signaling excites sensory neurons and mediates itch response in a mouse model of Poison ivy contact allergy,” Proceedings of the National Acadamy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 113, no. 47, pp. E7572–E7579, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. B. Liu, Y. Tai, A. I. Caceres et al., “Oxidized phospholipid OxPAPC activates TRPA1 and contributes to chronic inflammatory pain in mice,” PLoS ONE, vol. 11, no. 11, Article ID e0165200, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. L. S. Guzzo, T. R. L. Romero, C. M. Queiroz et al., “Involvement of endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by the coffee specific diterpene kahweol,” Pharmacological Reports, vol. 67, no. 5, article no. 291, pp. 1010–1015, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. J. D. Correa, P. Paiva-Lima, R. M. Rezende et al., “Peripheral μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors mediate the hypoalgesic effect of celecoxib in a rat model of thermal hyperalgesia,” Life Sciences, vol. 86, no. 25-26, pp. 951–956, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. A. Baamonde, A. Lastra, L. Juárez, V. García, A. Hidalgo, and L. Menéndez, “Effects of the local administration of selective μ-, δ-and κ-opioid receptor agonists on osteosarcoma-induced hyperalgesia,” Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, vol. 372, no. 3, pp. 213–219, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. I. Obara, J. R. Parkitna, M. Korostynski et al., “Local peripheral opioid effects and expression of opioid genes in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia in neuropathic and inflammatory pain,” PAIN, vol. 141, no. 3, pp. 283–291, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. J. M. Tall, N. P. Seeram, C. Zhao, M. G. Nair, R. A. Meyer, and S. N. Raja, “Tart cherry anthocyanins suppress inflammation-induced pain behavior in rat,” Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 153, no. 1, pp. 181–188, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. L. Lao, R.-X. Zhang, G. Zhang, X. Wang, B. M. Berman, and K. Ren, “A parametric study of electroacupuncture on persistent hyperalgesia and Fos protein expression in rats,” Brain Research, vol. 1020, no. 1-2, pp. 18–29, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. T. H. Rainer, C. H. Cheng, H. J. E. M. Janssens et al., “Oral prednisolone in the treatment of acute gout: A pragmatic, multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial,” Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 164, no. 7, pp. 464–471, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. G. Trevisan, C. Hoffmeister, M. F. Rossato et al., “TRPA1 receptor stimulation by hydrogen peroxide is critical to trigger hyperalgesia and inflammation in a model of acute gout,” Free Radical Biology & Medicine, vol. 72, pp. 200–209, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. G. Trevisan, C. Hoffmeister, M. F. Rossato et al., “Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 receptor stimulation by hydrogen peroxide is critical to trigger pain during monosodium urate-induced inflammation in rodents,” Arthritis & Rheumatology, vol. 65, no. 11, pp. 2984–2995, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. R. Torres, L. Macdonald, S. D. Croll et al., “Hyperalgesia, synovitis and multiple biomarkers of inflammation are suppressed by interleukin 1 inhibition in a novel animal model of gouty arthritis,” Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 68, no. 10, pp. 1602–1608, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. C. Hoffmeister, M. A. Silva, M. F. Rossato et al., “Participation of the TRPV1 receptor in the development of acute gout attacks,” Rheumatology, vol. 53, no. 2, Article ID ket352, pp. 240–249, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. X. F. He, J. J. Wei, S. Y. Shou, J. Q. Fang, and Y. L. Jiang, “Effects of electroacupuncture at 2 and 100 Hz on rat type 2 diabetic neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia-related protein expression in the dorsal root ganglion,” Journal of Zhejiang University Science B, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 239–248, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  46. H. J. Moon, B.-S. Lim, D.-I. Lee et al., “Effects of electroacupuncture on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold hypersensitivity in rats,” The Journal of Physiological Sciences, vol. 64, no. 2, pp. 151–156, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. X. Meng, Y. Zhang, A. Li et al., “The effects of opioid receptor antagonists on electroacupuncture-produced anti-allodynia/hyperalgesia in rats with paclitaxel-evoked peripheral neuropathy,” Brain Research, vol. 1414, pp. 58–65, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. C. Stein and L. J. Lang, “Peripheral mechanisms of opioid analgesia,” Current Opinion in Pharmacology, vol. 9, no. 1, p. 3, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  49. S. Dembla, M. Behrendt, F. Mohr et al., “Anti-nociceptive action of peripheral mu-opioid receptors by G-beta-gamma protein-mediated inhibition of TRPM3 channels,” eLife, vol. 6, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  50. R. X. Zhang, L. Lao, X. Wang et al., “Electroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat model,” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 135–142, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  51. D. V. Gondim, J. L. Costa, S. S. Rocha, G. A. D. C. Brito, R. D. A. Ribeiro, and M. L. Vale, “Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of electroacupuncture on experimental arthritis of the rat temporomandibular joint,” Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, vol. 90, no. 4, pp. 395–405, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. Y. Jiang, X. He, X. Yin, Y. Shen, and J. Fang, “Anti-inflammatory and synovial-opioid system effects of electroacupuncture intervention on chronic pain in arthritic rats,” Chinese acupuncture & moxibustion, vol. 35, no. 9, pp. 917–921, 2015. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus