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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2018, Article ID 4868412, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4868412
Research Article

Royal Jelly Supplementation Improves Menopausal Symptoms Such as Backache, Low Back Pain, and Anxiety in Postmenopausal Japanese Women

1Institute for Bee Products and Health Science, Yamada Bee Company, Inc., Okayama, Japan
2Division of Women’s Health, Research Institute of Traditional Asian Medicine, Kindai University, Osaka, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Takashi Asama; moc.eeb-adamay@2201at

Received 24 January 2018; Accepted 27 March 2018; Published 29 April 2018

Academic Editor: Attila Hunyadi

Copyright © 2018 Takashi Asama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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