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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2019, Article ID 1317842, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/1317842
Review Article

A Review on the Nonpharmacological Therapy of Traditional Chinese Medicine with Antihypertensive Effects

1Longhua Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China
2The Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of TCM, Shandong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ping Liu; moc.621@7020gnipuil and Youhua Wang; moc.361@hywrotcod

Received 11 August 2018; Revised 9 October 2018; Accepted 12 November 2018; Published 2 January 2019

Academic Editor: Arthur De Sá Ferreira

Copyright © 2019 Hua Fan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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