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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2019, Article ID 7861297, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/7861297
Research Article

Hericium erinaceus Improves Mood and Sleep Disorders in Patients Affected by Overweight or Obesity: Could Circulating Pro-BDNF and BDNF Be Potential Biomarkers?

1Occupational Medicine Unit, Clinica del Lavoro Luigi Devoto, Obesity and Work Center at IRCCS Foundation Policlinico Hospital of Milan, 20133, Italy
2Biochemical and Microbiology Unit, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico Hospital of Milan, 20122, Italy
3Department of Biology and Biotechnology “L. Spallanzani”, University of Pavia, 27100, Italy
4Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Pavia, 27100, Italy
5Department of Fundamental Neurosciences (NEUFO), University of Geneva, 1211, Switzerland

Correspondence should be addressed to Paola Rossi; ti.vpinu@issor.aloap

Received 5 February 2019; Revised 2 April 2019; Accepted 9 April 2019; Published 18 April 2019

Academic Editor: Ching-Liang Hsieh

Copyright © 2019 Luisella Vigna et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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