Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Eastern Medicine: From Nutritional Supplements to Cancer Research


Publishing date
23 May 2014
Status
Published
Submission deadline
03 Jan 2014

Lead Editor

1University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA

2New York College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, New York, NY, USA

3Fourth Military Medical University, Xian, Shaanxi, China

4National Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA


Eastern Medicine: From Nutritional Supplements to Cancer Research

Description

Eastern medicine, encompassing traditional Chinese Medicine (ranging from subspecialties such as acupuncture and Qi Gong), Kampo, Ayurveda, and other healing arts, has the potential of delivering an alternative to the toxic effects of certain Western medications. The increased popularity of herbs as dietary supplements with little government oversight and a lack of standard quality control from manufacturers are problematic for consumers whose understanding of the therapeutic effect of these herbs is rudimentary at best. Because of batch-to-batch variations, disparities in preparation, concentration, and perhaps even chemical composition of these supplements, it is questionable whether Western manufactured herbs share the same therapeutic effects as the ones prepared according to traditional Eastern methods. The use of herbs in conjunction with prescription drugs is challenging due to the lack of juried research and studies concerning possible cross-interactions between medicines. This combined with a lack of knowledge and training among health professionals creates the potential for significant health issues. Qualitative and quantitative testing, biostatistical studies of therapies, and better manufacturing controls are needed for the effective use of Eastern medicines, both as a complement to or alternative to Western treatments.

For example, Western cancer treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy have many adverse side effects. Eastern Medicine could help mitigate those side effects by minimizing the symptoms or reducing dosage requirements when used in conjunction with current Western treatments and therapies. Immunological, enzymatic, and molecular biological-related research could benefit from studies of effective Eastern Medicinal treatments. Cellular and bioprocessing approaches could eventually modify our way of scientific research in treating illnesses from colds to cancers. Studies of the ways in which Western mainstream medicine and technology can be integrated with traditional Eastern medicine are the focus of this special issue. Both original research and high-quality reviews are welcome in this special issue of the journal. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Incompatibility and synergism among herbs and certain drugs and foods
  • Minimization of adverse reaction of herbs by unaware public
  • Qualitative and quantitative testing for, and biostatistical analysis of, herbal medicine
  • Research of genomics and proteomics on cancer prevention and therapy
  • Original research or systemic review of proven methods for the treatment of cancer or other intractable diseases that involve Eastern medicine
  • Methods or herbal recipes that alleviate or minimizing the undesirable side effects of conventional radiation or/and chemotherapy

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal’s Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/ecam/eastw/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 817126
  • - Editorial

Eastern Medicine: From Nutritional Supplements to Cancer Research

Dominic P. Lu | Yemeng Chen | ... | Leo M. Lee
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 378684
  • - Research Article

Role of JNK Activation and Mitochondrial Bax Translocation in Allicin-Induced Apoptosis in Human Ovarian Cancer SKOV3 Cells

Ling Xu | Jin Yu | ... | Chaoqin Yu
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 670743
  • - Research Article

Cryptotanshinone Reverses Reproductive and Metabolic Disturbances in PCOS Model Rats via Regulating the Expression of CYP17 and AR

Jin Yu | Dongxia Zhai | ... | Chaoqin Yu
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 328684
  • - Research Article

Inhibitory Effects of Gymnema (Gymnema sylvestre) Leaves on Tumour Promotion in Two-Stage Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

Ken Yasukawa | Sakiko Okuda | Yasuhito Nobushi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 251891
  • - Review Article

Impact of Chinese Herbal Medicine on American Society and Health Care System: Perspective and Concern

Winston I. Lu | Dominic P. Lu
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 985176
  • - Research Article

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of 81 Chinese Herb Extracts and Their Correlation with the Characteristics of Traditional Chinese Medicine

Chang-Liang Chen | Dan-Dan Zhang
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 497456
  • - Research Article

Capilliposide Isolated from Lysimachia capillipes Hemsl. Induces ROS Generation, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Human Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

Zheng-hua Fei | Kan Wu | ... | Sheng-lin Ma
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate26%
Submission to final decision70 days
Acceptance to publication39 days
CiteScore2.010
Impact Factor1.984
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