Emergency Medicine International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate28%
Submission to final decision64 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore0.890
Journal Citation Indicator0.520
Impact Factor1.112

The Relationship between Routine Blood Parameters and the Prognosis of COVID-19 Patients in the Emergency Department

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 Journal profile

Emergency Medicine International publishes original research articles and review articles related to prehospital care, disaster preparedness and response, acute medical and paediatric emergencies, critical care and wound care

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Emergency Medicine International maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

A WeChat-Based Mobile Platform for Perioperative Health Education for Gastrointestinal Surgery

Appropriately instructing and guiding patients before and after surgery is essential for their successful recovery. In recent years, however, the development of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol has restricted the opportunity for healthcare professionals to spend time with their patients before and after surgery because of efficiency-driven, shortened hospital stay. Here, we embedded health education information of the perioperative period for gastrointestinal surgery on a WeChat-based mobile platform and evaluated the platform through medical staff evaluation, patient volunteer evaluation, and quantitative grading rubric. Clinicians and nurses believed that the mobile platform was attractively designed and easy to navigate, valuable, and adequate for patient health education. The content of health education was embedded into the WeChat-based mobile platform, thereby allowing patients and caregivers to access information at their own pace and enable repeat reading.

Research Article

The Prediction Model of Risk Factors for COVID-19 Developing into Severe Illness Based on 1046 Patients with COVID-19

This study analyzed the risk factors for patients with COVID-19 developing severe illnesses and explored the value of applying the logistic model combined with ROC curve analysis to predict the risk of severe illnesses at COVID-19 patients’ admissions. The clinical data of 1046 COVID-19 patients admitted to a designated hospital in a certain city from July to September 2020 were retrospectively analyzed, the clinical characteristics of the patients were collected, and a multivariate unconditional logistic regression analysis was used to determine the risk factors for severe illnesses in COVID-19 patients during hospitalization. Based on the analysis results, a prediction model for severe conditions and the ROC curve were constructed, and the predictive value of the model was assessed. Logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR = 3.257, 95% CI 10.466–18.584), complications with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR = 7.337, 95% CI 0.227–87.021), cough (OR = 5517, 95% CI 0.258–65.024), and venous thrombosis (OR = 7322, 95% CI 0.278–95.020) were risk factors for COVID-19 patients developing severe conditions during hospitalization. When complications were not taken into consideration, COVID-19 patients’ ages, number of diseases, and underlying diseases were risk factors influencing the development of severe illnesses. The ROC curve analysis results showed that the AUC that predicted the severity of COVID-19 patients at admission was 0.943, the optimal threshold was −3.24, and the specificity was 0.824, while the sensitivity was 0.827. The changes in the condition of severe COVID-19 patients are related to many factors such as age, clinical symptoms, and underlying diseases. This study has a certain value in predicting COVID-19 patients that develop from mild to severe conditions, and this prediction model is a useful tool in the quick prediction of the changes in patients’ conditions and providing early intervention for those with risk factors.

Research Article

Laparoscopic Intervention to Pancreatic Pseudocyst Confers Short-Term Benefits: A Meta-Analysis

Background. Surgical interventions for pancreatic pseudocyst (PP) are traditionally managed by an open surgical approach. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, a laparoscopic surgical approach for PPs has been conducted increasingly with comparable outcomes. The present study was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of surgical intervention for PPs between the laparoscopic approach and the open approach. Methods. Databases including Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE were searched to identify studies that compared the safety and efficacy of surgical intervention for PPs between the laparoscopic approach and the open approach (until Aug 1st 2020). Results. A total of 6 studies were eligible in qualitative synthesis. The laparoscopic approach was associated with less intraoperative blood loss (MD = −69.97; 95% CI: −95.14 to −44.70, ; for heterogeneity) and shorter operating time (MD = −33.12; 95% CI: −62.24 to −4.00, ; for heterogeneity). There was no significant difference found between the two approaches regarding the success rate and the recurrence rate. The postoperative complications and mortality rates were comparable between the two approaches. Conclusions. The laparoscopic approach for the surgical intervention of PPs is safe and efficacious with shorter-term benefits.

Research Article

Comparison of Enoxaparin and Rivaroxaban in the Prophylaxis of Deep Venous Thrombosis in Arthroplasty

Background. Pulmonary embolism is a serious early complication of arthroplasty procedures that can develop after deep venous thrombosis. The present study aimed to compare rivaroxaban and enoxaparin in terms of preventing DV and PE, and also in this study, we compared the complications due to these drugs in patients undergoing elective arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. 214 patients were divided into three groups based on their treatment regimens. In group I, enoxaparin was used, in group II, rivaroxaban was used, and in group III, enoxaparin was used throughout hospitalization, and after hospital discharge, rivaroxaban was used. These three groups were compared according to the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and major and minor complications. Results. Major postoperative complications occurred in 5, 15, and 6 patients in group I, II, and III, respectively. Minor postoperative complications occurred in 10, 24, and 11 patients in group I, II, and III, respectively. No significant difference was found among the three groups. Deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism was not observed in any patient. Conclusion. Rivaroxaban was found to be as effective as enoxaparin in the prevention of deep venous thrombosis and other complications after arthroplasty. Moreover, oral rivaroxaban provided greater ease of use compared to subcutaneous enoxaparin. Based on these findings, we consider that rivaroxaban could be an effective alternative to enoxaparin.

Research Article

Burden of Road Traffic Injuries in Tanzania: One-Year Prospective Study of Consecutive Patients in 13 Multilevel Health Facilities

Background. Road traffic injuries (RTIs) pose a severe public health crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and specifically in Tanzania, where the mortality due to RTIs is nearly double the global rate. There is a paucity of RTI data in Tanzania to inform evidence-based interventions to reduce the incidence and improve care outcomes. A trauma registry was implemented at 13 health facilities of diverse administrative levels in Tanzania. In this study, we characterize the burden of RTIs seen at these health facilities. Methods. This was a one-year prospective descriptive study utilizing trauma registry data from 13 multilevel health facilities in Tanzania from 1 October 2019 to 30 September 2020. We provide descriptive statistics on patient demographics; location; share of injury; nature, type, and circumstances of RTI; injury severity; disposition; and outcomes. Results. Among 18,553 trauma patients seen in 13 health facilities, 7,416 (40%) had RTIs. The overall median age was 28 years (IQR 22–38 years), and 79.3% were male. Most road traffic crashes (RTC) occurred in urban settings (68.7%), involving motorcycles (68.3%). Motorcyclists (32.9%) were the most affected road users; only 37% of motorcyclists wore helmets at the time of the crash. The majority (88.2%) of patients arrived directly from the site, and 49.0% used motorized (two- or three-) wheelers to travel to the health facility. Patients were more likely to be admitted to the ward, taken to operating theatre, died at emergency unit (EU), or referred versus being discharged if they had intracranial injuries (27.8% vs. 3.7%; ), fracture of the lower leg (18.9% vs. 6.4%; ), or femur fracture (12.9% vs. 0.4%; ). Overall, 36.1% of patients were admitted, 10.6% transferred to other facilities, and mortality was 2%. Conclusions. RTCs are the main cause of trauma in this setting, affecting mostly working-age males. These RTCs result in severe injuries requiring hospital admission or referral for almost half of the victims. Motorcyclists are the most affected group, in alignment with prior studies. These findings demonstrate the burden of RTCs as a public health concern in Tanzania and the need for targeted interventions with a focus on motorcyclists.

Research Article

The Association of the Phylogenetic Typing of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates with Antibiotic Resistance

Klebsiella pneumoniae complex (KPC) accounts for approximately one-third of all Gram-negative infections. Moreover, it is highly resistant and can taxonomically be distributed into KpI, KpII, and KpIII phylogroups. This study aimed to investigate the distribution of phylogenetic groups and the relationship between them and antibiotic resistance patterns. For this purpose, we collected KPC isolates from Tabriz, Iran, between 2018 and 2020. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion agar, and phylogenetic groups were then examined using gyrA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and parC PCR methods. A total of 100 KPC isolates were obtained from the clinical specimens (urine, respiratory secretion, blood, wounds, and trachea). The enrolled patients included 47 men and 53 women aged from 1 to 91 years old. The highest sensitivity was found related to fosfomycin as 85%, followed by amikacin as 66%. The three phylogenetically groups by the RFLP-PCR method were found in KPC, 96% (96 isolates) as KpI, 3% (3 isolates) as KpII, and 1% (1isolate) as KpIII. The highest antibiotic resistance was observed in KpI. It was shown that a valid identification of three phylogenetic groups of KPC can be done by combining both gyrA PCR-RFLP and parC PCR. Of note, the KpI group was also observed as the dominant phylogenetic group with the highest resistance to antibiotics.

Emergency Medicine International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate28%
Submission to final decision64 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore0.890
Journal Citation Indicator0.520
Impact Factor1.112
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.