Emergency Medicine International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate28%
Submission to final decision64 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore0.890
Impact Factor0.841

Comparative Study on the Outcome of Stroke Patients Transferred by Doctor Helicopters and Ground Ambulances in South Korea: A Retrospective Controlled Study

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Emergency Medicine International publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies related to prehospital care, disaster preparedness and response, acute medical and paediatric emergencies, critical care and wound care

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Emergency Medicine International maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

Utility of a Modified Oropharyngeal Airway for Performing Tracheal Intubation Using a Fiberoptic Bronchoscope and Video Stylet: A Randomized Crossover Trial Using a Manikin

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess if a modified airway (MA), developed by the authors, would act as a guide and improve the performance of intubation when used with a video stylet (VS) or fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) for endotracheal intubation. Methods. This randomized crossover simulation study using manikins was conducted with 36 novice operators. Time to complete intubation, time to see the glottis, and success rate of intubation of each device were measured and compared with or without use of MA. Results. For intubation using FOB with MA, the median time to complete intubation significantly reduced from 46 to 31 seconds with a medium effect size (, r = 0.483), and the median time to see the glottis significantly reduced from 7 to 5 seconds with a medium effect size (, r = 0.357). The overall success rate was not statistically different between FOB with MA (33/36, 91.7%) and FOB alone (31/36, 86.1%); however, the cumulative success rate over time for FOB with MA was higher than that for FOB alone (). For intubation using VS, there were no differences in the time to see the glottis and time to complete intubation between VS with MA and VS alone ( and , respectively), and the cumulative success rate was not statistically significant (). Conclusion. Adjunct use of MA helped reduce time to complete intubation in FOB, but not in VS. If an inexperienced operator uses FOB, it would be helpful to use MA as an adjunct device.

Research Article

Feasibility of a Telemedicine Urgent Care Program to Address Patient Complaints on First Contact

Many health systems employ nurse telephone advice services to facilitate remote triage of patients to appropriate level of care. However, the effectiveness of these programs to reduce ED and subsequent health care utilization remains to be demonstrated. We describe a novel virtual urgent care program implemented within a Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system that interfaces with a nurse telephone advice line and leverages telemedicine tools to rapidly address and resolve nonemergent conditions. During a 4-month pilot period, 104 unique patients received care through the program, and over 85% of patients achieved timely resolution for their urgent complaints on first contact with the health care system. Demonstrating feasibility for such a program has potential implications for the optimization of remote triage and urgent care services to improve health care utilization and outcomes.

Research Article

Risk Values of Weight and Body Mass Index for Chest Wall Thickness in Patients Requiring Needle Thoracostomy Decompression

Introduction. Emergency decompression is needed in patients with tension pneumothorax, a life-threatening condition. The catheter-based needle thoracostomy was suggested using a 5 cm catheter inserted into the 2nd intercostal space (ICS) and 5th ICS according to the ninth and tenth editions of Advanced Trauma Life Support, respectively. A catheter of suitable length may not be available immediately or the muscle structure of the chest wall may be modified in pneumothorax. Furthermore, alternative sites for needle thoracostomy and reference values of chest wall thickness (CWT) should be explored and warranted. Method. CT scan data and medical data of 650 eligible patients from October 2016 to December 2016 were reviewed. CWT values at four ICSs as well as four variables, namely, age, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) for both men and women were compared using a nonparametric method, namely, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The associations between CWT and the four variables were assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The overall performance of BMI, weight, and height in predicting CWT  5 cm was evaluated using the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Finally, the prediction models were built by using the bootstrap method. Results. Four variables, namely, age, height, weight, and BMI, were compared between the men and women groups. All four variables differed significantly between the two groups, and CWTs at all ICSs, except for the 3rd ICS, differed significantly between the two groups. Among the women, the area under the ROC curve (AUROC) of BMI for predicting CWT  5 cm at 2nd ICS was larger than the AUROC of weight and height. Among the men, the AUROC of weight for predicting CWT  5 cm at 2nd ICS was larger than that of BMI and height. The reference value tables were provided for five proposed models for women and men, respectively. Under emergencies, the variable, BMI, or even weight itself, could be used for predicting a failure performance of the needle decompression. For women, CWT at 5th ICS was predicted over 5 cm at BMI over 25.9 kg/ or weight over 103.1 kg. For men, CWT at 5th ICS was predicted over 5 cm at BMI over 25.5 kg/ or weight over 157.4 kg. Conclusion. Needle thoracostomy is the preferred first technique for many emergency providers for decompression. Therefore, a reference table for safe needle thoracostomy decompression at four usual sites, namely, 2nd ICS, 3rd CIS, 4th ICS, and 5th ICS, was recommended, which will enable paramedics and emergency specialists to rapidly determine CWT at the appropriate ICSs during emergencies.

Research Article

Comparing Mortality Risk Predictive Ability of Different Scoring Systems in Cirrhotic Patients with Bacteremia

Patients with liver cirrhosis and bacteremia have substantially higher risk of mortality and morbidity. Our study aimed to investigate scoring systems that can predict the mortality risk in patients with cirrhosis and bacteremia. A single-center, retrospective cohort study was performed among adult patients who visited the emergency department from January 2015 to December 2018. All patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis and bacteremia were enrolled and divided into survivor and nonsurvivor groups for comparison based on their 30-day in-hospital mortality event. The Pitt bacteremia score (PBS), model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, Child–Pugh score, and quick sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score were calculated and compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves. A total of 127 patients (survivor: 86; nonsurvivor: 41) were eligible for this study. Compared with the nonsurvivor group, patients in the survivor group had significantly lower MELD score (22 ± 7 vs. 29 ± 5, ), lower proportion of high qSOFA (score ≥ 2) (23.3% vs. 51.2%, ), and high PBS (score ≥ 4) (7.0% vs. 34.1%, ) category. There was also a significantly different distribution in Child–Pugh classification between the two groups . The survivor group had significantly lower proportion of acute-on-chronic liver failure (27.9% vs. 68.3%, ) and fewer number of organ failures . In comparison of the discriminative ability in mortality risk prediction, PBS (AUROC = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.75–0.90, ) and MELD scores (AUROC = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.70–0.86, ) revealed a better predictive ability than Child–Pugh (AUROC = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.59–0.70, ) and qSOFA scores (AUROC = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.54–0.75, ). PBS and MELD scores both demonstrated a superior ability of predicting mortality risk in cirrhotic patients with bacteremia.

Review Article

Disaster Preparedness among Emergency Medical Service Providers: A Systematic Review Protocol

Background. The emergency medical service (EMS) provides first-line medical care to people who require urgent medical care in emergency and disaster situations. Preparedness is the most effective approach for the management of disaster risks, and it is essential for the emergency medical service (EMS) providers, such as paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMT), and other EMS personnel. This systematic review will explore evidence on the preparedness of emergency medical service providers in emergency and disaster situations by reviewing peer-reviewed journal articles. Methods/Design. This study will be conducted on peer-reviewed articles published between 2005 and 2019 to explore the preparedness of emergency medical service providers in emergencies and disasters. Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, and Google Scholar will be thoroughly searched to identify published studies on emergency and disaster preparedness. The following keywords will be used for searching the databases: “Medical Technician,” “Paramedic,” “Emergency Paramedic,” “Emergency Medicine Technician,” “Emergency Medical Technician,” “Emergency Prehospital Provider,” “Emergency Preparedness,” “Disaster Preparedness,” “Hospital Preparedness,” “Disaster management,” “Disaster Competencies,” “Disaster Readiness,” “Disaster,” “Disaster Role,” “Readiness, Preparedness, Terrorist,” “Mass Casualty Incident,” “Major incidents,” “Mass Casualty,” “Mass Gathering,” “CBRNE,” “Weapons of Mass Destruction,” and “Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive Event.” Discussion. To the best of our knowledge, no comprehensive review study has been conducted on the preparedness of emergency medical service providers in disaster situations. This study is the first attempt to address this gap. It will also explore the key dimensions in disaster preparedness of EMS providers and the strategies to enhance their preparedness. Identifying the key dimensions of disaster preparedness is the first step in designing and developing valid instruments to evaluate EMS provider’s disaster preparedness and as well as adopting appropriate strategies to improve the level of their preparedness (This systematic review is registred in PROSPERO with CRD42020149689).

Research Article

The Study of Incidence and Characteristics of Patients with Eye-Related Chief Complaints at the Emergency Department of Thammasat University Hospital

Background. Patients with eye-related chief complaints could be diagnosed not only with eye diseases but also with noneye diseases. This study determines rates and characteristics of patients with eye-related chief complaints at the Emergency Department of Thammasat University Hospital. Methods. The study design is a descriptive retrospective observational study of patients with eye-related chief complaints at the Emergency Department of Thammasat University Hospital in 2017. Demographic data, diagnosis, management, consultation, and disposition were recorded by chart review. Categorical data were reported by percentage. Results. Of the 52081 patients, 704 (1.3%) presented with eye problems. 60% of the patients were males. Patients were classified into three groups which are traumatic eye disease, nontraumatic eye disease, and noneye disease. 75.9% of the patients suffered traumatic injuries. The most common diagnoses of the traumatic eye injuries were foreign bodies at the cornea and conjunctiva and minor trauma to the conjunctiva. The most common mechanisms were foreign bodies in the eyes, cuts, or pierces. The most common causes of the injuries were from metals and housewares. The most common nontraumatic eye diagnoses were conjunctivitis and corneal ulcer. The most common noneye diagnoses were exposure of healthcare providers to secretions from patients, angioedema, and hypertensive crisis. Conclusions. Most of the patients who came to the ER with chief complaints of the eyes could be treated by doctors in the emergency room without consulting ophthalmologists. Chief complaints of the eyes could be the leading symptoms of many organ systems. Emergency physicians should be differentially diagnosed to cover neurologic, cardiovascular, and immunologic problems.

Emergency Medicine International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate28%
Submission to final decision64 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore0.890
Impact Factor0.841
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