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Emergency Medicine International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 476161, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/476161
Research Article

Prehospital Medication Administration: A Randomised Study Comparing Intranasal and Intravenous Routes

1Centre for Emergency Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
2Medical Advisory Group of the Pre-hospital Emergency Care Council in Ireland, Naas, Ireland

Received 3 April 2012; Revised 5 June 2012; Accepted 11 June 2012

Academic Editor: Oliver Flower

Copyright © 2012 Cian McDermott and Niamh C. Collins. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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