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Emergency Medicine International
Volume 2012, Article ID 603215, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/603215
Research Article

Encountering Anger in the Emergency Department: Identification, Evaluations and Responses of Staff Members to Anger Displays

1Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Weesperplein 4, 1018 XA Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2William Davidson Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management at Technion City, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel
3Department of Emergency Medicine, The Western Galilee Hospital, P.O. Box 21, Naharia 22100, Israel

Received 9 April 2012; Revised 14 June 2012; Accepted 14 June 2012

Academic Editor: Rade B. Vukmir

Copyright © 2012 Cheshin Arik et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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