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Emergency Medicine International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 729795, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/729795
Research Article

Tulsa Oklahoma Oktoberfest Tent Collapse Report

1OTEMS (Oologah-Talala EMS), 18955 S 4150 Road, Claremore, OK 74017-3609, USA
2Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Oklahoma School of Medicine, Tulsa, OK 74135, USA
3Oklahoma Disaster Institute, Tulsa, OK 74135, USA

Received 3 September 2011; Accepted 5 January 2012

Academic Editor: Christopher Colwell

Copyright © 2012 Kelly E. Deal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. On October 17, 2007, a severe weather event collapsed two large tents and several smaller tents causing 23 injuries requiring evacuation to emergency departments in Tulsa, OK. Methods. This paper is a retrospective analysis of the regional health system’s response to this event. Data from the Tulsa Fire Department, The Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA), receiving hospitals and coordinating services were reviewed and analyzed. EMS patient care reports were reviewed and analyzed using triage designators assigned in the field, injury severity scores, and critical mortality. Results. EMT's and paramedics from Tulsa Fire Department and EMSA provided care at the scene under unified incident command. Of the 23 patients transported by EMS, four were hospitalized, one with critical spinal injury and one with critical head injury. One patient is still in ongoing rehabilitation. Discussion. Analysis of the 2007 Tulsa Oktoberfest mass casualty incident revealed rapid police/fire/EMS response despite challenges of operations at dark under severe weather conditions and the need to treat a significant number of injured victims. There were no fatalities. Of the patients transported by EMS, a minority sustained critical injuries, with most sustaining injuries amenable to discharge after emergency department care.