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Enzyme Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 329098, 26 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/329098
Review Article

Protein Kinases and Phosphatases in the Control of Cell Fate

Section of General Pathology, Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Inflammation (ICSI) and LTTA Center, University of Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara, Italy

Received 15 March 2011; Revised 6 May 2011; Accepted 8 June 2011

Academic Editor: Heung Chin Cheng

Copyright © 2011 Angela Bononi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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