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Enzyme Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 392082, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/392082
Review Article

Phospholipases A in Trypanosomatids

Departamento de Microbiología, Parasitología e Inmunología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paraguay 2155, piso 13, C1121ABG Buenos Aires, Argentina

Received 23 December 2010; Accepted 7 February 2011

Academic Editor: Claudio Alejandro Pereira

Copyright © 2011 María Laura Belaunzarán et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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