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Enzyme Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 576483, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/576483
Review Article

Singular Features of Trypanosomatids' Phosphotransferases Involved in Cell Energy Management

Laboratorio de Biología Molecular de Trypanosoma cruzi (LBMTC), Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas “Alfredo Lanari”, Universidad de Buenos Aires and CONICET, Combatientes de Malvinas 3150, 1427 Buenos Aires, Argentina

Received 21 December 2010; Revised 23 January 2011; Accepted 8 February 2011

Academic Editor: Ariel M. Silber

Copyright © 2011 Claudio A. Pereira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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