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Geofluids
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 4834601, 19 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4834601
Research Article

CO2 Leakage-Induced Contamination in Shallow Potable Aquifer and Associated Health Risk Assessment

1Department of Earth System Sciences, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
2College of Earth System Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea
3Key Laboratory of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Jilin, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Weon Shik Han; rk.ca.iesnoy@wnah

Received 29 November 2017; Accepted 31 January 2018; Published 5 April 2018

Academic Editor: Liangping Li

Copyright © 2018 Chan Yeong Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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