Geofluids

Coupled Geoflow Processes in Subsurface: CO2-Sequestration and Geoenergy Focus


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Guest Editors

1CSIRO Energy, Canberra, Australia

2Jilin University, Changchun, China

3Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea


Coupled Geoflow Processes in Subsurface: CO2-Sequestration and Geoenergy Focus

Description

To mitigate the challenge of climate change caused by carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases produced due to human-activities, two aspects of effort are being made globally. The way of capturing and storing the greenhouse-gas released from combustion of the first one is through fossil fuels, to reduce the amount of the gas emission into the atmosphere or the marine accumulation of the gas. The second one is to develop alternative, renewable energy resources that are of zero or much less greenhouse-gas emission to reduce or to replace the use of fossil fuels.

Sequestration of the greenhouse-gas in geological formations and utilisation of CO2 to enhance extraction of geothermal energy from the subsurface are, amid many other techniques, two typical practices towards the goal of controlling or slowing the trend of climate change whose destructive impacts to the earth have already been observed. Over the past two decades, there have been a number of pioneering field-trials in the world for geological storage of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. Additionally, there have been many successful applications for enhancing production of the geothermal energy.

Geological sequestration of the greenhouse-gas and extraction of the geoenergy from the subsurface are two opposite flow processes. Nevertheless, they share a lot in common; both disturb the (dynamic) equilibria of the natural environment in the subsurface and may result in complex physical, chemical, mechanical, and thermal changes to the local geological circumstance. These changes would, in turn, affect the relevant operational efficiency and could also give rise to additional, unexpected environmental safety and security issues. Therefore, it is crucial to have in-depth understanding to what changes may be introduced there, and how the fluid flow behaves under these changes.

We solicit high-quality, original research articles as well as review papers focused on geological sequestration of CO2/other greenhouse gases and the utilisation of CO2 to extract geoenergy from the subsurface. The work can be based on theoretical and numerical analyses, or the laboratory tests. Case or field-oriented studies, which bring in new insights with practical observations, are also welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Nonisothermal flow behaviour of stored CO2 and other greenhouse gases in geological formations
  • The use of CO2 for enhancing recovery of subsurface energies such as oil, gas, and geothermal resources
  • Mechanical failure of storage or sealing formations due to injected CO2 and other greenhouse gases
  • Hydrothermal-mechanical coupling processes associated with CO2 transport in sedimentary rocks
  • Risk and safety assessment for stored CO2 and other greenhouse gases in geological formations and the potential impacts on geological environments
  • Chemical reactions induced by injected CO2 and other greenhouse gases with sedimentary rocks
  • Theory, numerical simulation, and operation techniques in relation to geothermal energy exploration and development
  • Application of hydraulic fracturing to geothermal energy utilisation and its impact on geological environment
  • Direct imaging of CO2 distribution in cores
  • Performance standards and site-specific assessments of geochemical and hydrological conditions

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 5687586
  • - Editorial

Coupled Geoflow Processes in Subsurface: CO2-Sequestration and Geoenergy Focus

Meng Lu | Tianfu Xu | Weon Shik Han
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 5675370
  • - Research Article

Evaluation of CO2-Fluid-Rock Interaction in Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Field-Scale Geochemical Simulations

Feng Pan | Brian J. McPherson | John Kaszuba
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 6059142
  • - Research Article

Evaluating Reservoir Risks and Their Influencing Factors during CO2 Injection into Multilayered Reservoirs

Lu Shi | Bing Bai | ... | Xiaochun Li
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 8536724
  • - Research Article

Evaluating the Sealing Effectiveness of a Caprock-Fault System for CO2-EOR Storage: A Case Study of the Shengli Oilfield

Bing Bai | Qifang Hu | ... | Xiaochun Li
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 6126505
  • - Review Article

Worldwide Status of CCUS Technologies and Their Development and Challenges in China

H. J. Liu | P. Were | ... | Z. Hou
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 2041072
  • - Research Article

An Approximate Solution for Predicting the Heat Extraction and Preventing Heat Loss from a Closed-Loop Geothermal Reservoir

Bisheng Wu | Tianshou Ma | ... | Xi Zhang
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 4278621
  • - Research Article

Numerical Investigation into the Impact of CO2-Water-Rock Interactions on CO2 Injectivity at the Shenhua CCS Demonstration Project, China

Guodong Yang | Yilian Li | ... | Yongsheng Wang
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 2759267
  • - Research Article

On Heat and Mass Transfer within Thermally Shocked Region of Enhanced Geothermal System

Kamran Jahan Bakhsh | Masami Nakagawa | ... | Lucila Dunnington
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 1958463
  • - Research Article

Effect of Flow Direction on Relative Permeability Curves in Water/Gas Reservoir System: Implications in Geological CO2 Sequestration

Abdulrauf Rasheed Adebayo | Assad A. Barri | Muhammad Shahzad Kamal
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 9692517
  • - Research Article

On Fluid and Thermal Dynamics in a Heterogeneous CO2 Plume Geothermal Reservoir

Tianfu Xu | Huixing Zhu | ... | Hailong Tian
Geofluids
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Acceptance rate47%
Submission to final decision86 days
Acceptance to publication41 days
CiteScore2.100
Impact Factor1.534
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