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Genetics Research International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 643628, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/643628
Review Article

The Role of Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Secondary Centromere Deletion in the Evolution of Myeloid Malignancy

1Victorian Cancer Cytogenetics Service, St Vincent's Hospital (Melbourne) Ltd., P.O. Box 2900, Fitzroy, VIC 3065, Australia
2Department of Medicine (St Vincent's), University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia

Received 31 May 2011; Accepted 20 July 2011

Academic Editor: Sergio Roa

Copyright © 2011 Ruth N. MacKinnon and Lynda J. Campbell. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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