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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2016, Article ID 4101248, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4101248
Research Article

Influence of Rectal Decompression on Abdominal Symptoms and Anorectal Physiology following Colonoscopy in Healthy Adults

Department of Medicine, Hualien Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation and Tzu Chi University, Hualien 97002, Taiwan

Received 17 June 2016; Accepted 31 July 2016

Academic Editor: Branka Filipović

Copyright © 2016 Chih-Hsun Yi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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