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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6184842, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6184842
Clinical Study

Pilot Clinical Trial of Indocyanine Green Fluorescence-Augmented Colonoscopy in High Risk Patients

1Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
2Department of Interventional Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Southeastern Regional Medical Center, Atlanta, GA 30265, USA
4Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
5Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA

Received 20 December 2015; Accepted 24 January 2016

Academic Editor: Paolo Gionchetti

Copyright © 2016 Rahul A. Sheth et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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