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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2017, Article ID 5184146, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5184146
Clinical Study

Prognostic Factors Affecting Long-Term Survival after Resection for Noncolorectal, Nonneuroendocrine, and Nonsarcoma Liver Metastases

Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cadore 48, 20900 Monza, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Fabio Uggeri; ti.biminu@ireggu.oibaf

Received 12 April 2017; Accepted 20 June 2017; Published 24 July 2017

Academic Editor: Haruhiko Sugimura

Copyright © 2017 Fabio Uggeri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aim. To evaluate feasibility and long-term outcome after hepatic resection for noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine, and nonsarcoma (NCNNNS) liver metastases in a single center. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed our experience on patients who underwent surgery for NCNNNS liver metastases from 1995 to 2015. Patient baseline characteristics, tumor features, treatment options, and postoperative outcome were retrieved. Results. We included 47 patients. The overall 5-year survival (OS) rate after hepatectomy was 27.6%, with a median survival of 21 months. Overall survival was significantly longer for patients operated for nongastrointestinal liver metastases when compared with gastrointestinal (41 versus 10 months; ). OS was significantly worse in patients with synchronous metastases than in those with metachronous disease (10 versus 22 months; ). The occurrence of major postoperative complication negatively affected long-term prognosis (OS 23.5 versus 9.0 months; ). Preoperative tumor characteristics (number and size of the lesions), intraoperative features (extension of resection, need for transfusions, and Pringle’s maneuver), and R0 at pathology were not associated with differences in overall survival. Conclusion. Liver resection represents a possible curative option for patients with NCNNNS metastases. The origin of the primary tumor and the timing of metastases presentation may help clinicians to better select which patients could take advantages from surgical intervention.