Health & Social Care in the Community
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Acceptance rate12%
Submission to final decision140 days
Acceptance to publication17 days
CiteScore3.300
Journal Citation Indicator0.770
Impact Factor2.4

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 Journal profile

Health and Social Care in the Community is an essential journal for anyone involved in nursing, social work, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, general practice, health psychology, health economy, primary health care and the promotion of health.

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Health and Social Care in the Community maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study. 

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This journal's articles appear in a wide range of abstracting and indexing databases, and are covered by numerous other services that aid discovery and access. Find out more about where and how the content of this journal is available.

Latest Articles

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Research Article

Cultural Myths, Superstitions, and Stigma Surrounding Dementia in a UK Bangladeshi Community

The last three census data highlighted that UK Bangladeshi communities have the worst health outcomes. This includes a higher risk of type two diabetes and heart diseases; both are risk factors for developing vascular dementia. However, little is known about Bangladeshi community members’ understandings of dementia, including cultural myths. This paper focuses on the cultural myths, superstitions, and stigma surrounding dementia in an English Bangladeshi community from the direct experiences of people living with dementia, their caregivers, and the views of dementia service providers/stakeholders. This qualitative research was undertaken with three distinct participant groups using semistructured interviews (n = 25), who were recruited from community settings. The first and second participant groups explored the experiences of people with dementia (n = 10) and their family caregivers (n = 10). The third group examined stakeholders’/service providers’ views (n = 5). Interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. Findings were reached using an interpretive approach, emphasising the sense people make in their own lives and experiences and how they frame and understand dementia. The study revealed that participants with dementia and their caregivers have “alternative” knowledge about dementia and do not necessarily understand dementia in a Westernised scientific/biomedical context. Misconceptions about dementia and belief in various myths and superstitions can lead people to go to spiritual healers or practice traditional remedies rather than to their GPs, delaying their dementia diagnosis. This paper concludes that there is a lack of awareness among the Bangladeshi participants and a need for targeted awareness about dementia to help dispel cultural myths and combat the stigma surrounding dementia within the Bangladeshi community.

Research Article

Coming to Terms: Korean Mothers’ Adaptation to Child Loss from Cancer

Bereaved mothers with a deep bond to their sick child experience a distinct grieving process. This study delved into how Korean bereaved mothers come to terms with their child’s death from cancer by exploring their bereavement and adaptation processes. In-depth interviews with 15 bereaved mothers yielded 14 subthemes within three overarching themes. These themes included the diverse coping mechanisms employed by the participants, attribution of meaning to their children’s deaths, and personal growth intertwined with their experiences. These findings underscore the critical need for professional support to assist these mothers in their search for meaning and coping with the loss, particularly in the context of the unique cultural context of Korea. Understanding cultural variations is crucial for expanding the knowledge base in this field and advancing culturally informed interventions to support mothers who grapple with the loss of a child due to cancer across varied cultural settings.

Review Article

The Co-Occurrence of Polypharmacy and Unmet Needs for Social Care in Older People: A Systematic Review

Polypharmacy is common in older people who often live with disability and dependency. The number of older people living with unmet needs for social care is also believed to be rising. Polypharmacy is simple to operationalise, whilst unmet needs are not routinely identified but are known to adversely affect health and well-being. Therefore, this systematic review aimed to investigate whether polypharmacy is a marker of unmet needs for social care in older people. Sixteen databases were searched from inception to January 2021. Studies were included if they reported quantitative data for polypharmacy (“multiple medicines”) in relation to unmet needs for social care (“relative or absolute”) in older people (“study criteria aged ≥55 years or mean age ≥55 in the sample as a whole or stratified data for the ≥55-year age group”) and were from a high-income country (defined by the World Bank). Quality was assessed using the National Institute for Health tool for observational studies. Four studies were identified from 2,549 citations, and overall, the quality of evidence was low. Some older people using multiple medications had their social care needs met, whilst others did not. However, there is a clear rationale as to why polypharmacy may be linked to unmet social care needs. Given the limited studies identified in this review, future research should explore this further. The type of unmet need measure may be important to understand the nature of the relationship between the use of multiple medications and unmet social care needs.

Review Article

Older Adults’ Experiences of Using Strategies to Maintain and Foster Social Participation: A Systematic Review with Metasynthesis of Qualitative Studies

Social participation is positively associated with older adults’ health. Health-care services, therefore, need to empower older adults to adapt to the social changes that accompany aging. This systematic review, with a metasynthesis of qualitative studies, aimed to describe and develop an understanding of home-dwelling older adults’ (65 yrs+) experiences of using strategies to maintain and foster their social participation. The main search was performed in March 2022 using the PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and AMED databases and included peer-reviewed articles published between 2012 and 2022. A total of 35 full-text articles from 15 different countries were included and assessed for quality by the assessment tool for qualitative studies provided by the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP). The metasynthesis resulted in the main theme: strategically creating routines that foster social participation and two main categories: inward-looking strategies for social participation and outward-looking strategies for social participation. Each main category contained three subcategories. The findings suggest that for perceiving social participation, it is important for older adults to create routines with patterns of activities and to be able to engage in these activities. The findings further reflect that older adults use earlier experiences of social participation to facilitate the making of routines. This indicates that health-care interventions supporting older adults’ social participation must be applied early and with a health-promotive focus. Conclusively, researchers need to develop interventions that support older adults in healthy activity patterns by raising awareness of how to use inward-looking and outward-looking strategies to create routines for social participation. The findings further suggest that older adults’ possibilities for social participation could be supported by designing accessible venues that facilitate spontaneous meetings and encourage older adults’ own choices and initiatives for social participation.

Research Article

Compassion Satisfaction and Compassion Fatigue: Experiences of Rehabilitation Healthcare Workers in Rural and Remote Locations in Australia

Purpose. This study sought to gain an understanding of rural and remote rehabilitation healthcare workers’ perceptions and experiences of compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue. Method. Sixteen rehabilitation workers from four national providers of rehabilitation services to rural and remote communities participated in semistructured interviews conducted by telephone over a four-month period in 2018-2019. Braun and Clarke’s six-phase framework guided the thematic analysis. Findings. Quality of work life, organisational and workplace culture, and organisational management practices, particularly key performance indicators (KPIs), were reported as impacting compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue. Sources of compassion satisfaction were also common to the development of compassion fatigue, suggesting that it is unlikely for compassion satisfaction to be experienced without risk of compassion fatigue. Conclusion. Although there are similarities in experiences of compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue with other remote healthcare workers, for rehabilitation workers, KPIs were a unique concern, mainly due to their uniformity regardless of geographic location. Participants’ concerns about meeting KPIs increased their work-related pressures, normalised unsafe work practices, and were a cause of recruitment and retention concerns. These perceived influences suggest that rehabilitation workers have a lower likelihood of developing and maintaining compassion satisfaction and a heightened risk of developing compassion fatigue than other rural or remote healthcare workers.

Research Article

A SWOT Analysis of Hospitals’ and HMO Representatives’ Opinions regarding Hospital at Home in Israel

Purpose. To examine attitudes regarding acute hospital at home (AHaH). Materials and Methods. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) questionnaire was developed to interview 14 managers from health management organizations (HMOs) and hospitals. A mixed-method (qualitative/quantitative) analysis was used. Results. AHaH was provided by hospital or HMO staff or outsourced (private suppliers). Differences in service pertained mainly to on-site testing and imaging tools. All agreed that AHaH is favorable for patient outcomes and experience and that AHaH promotes medical service and clinical development. Barriers expressed were as follows: choosing the right patient; burden for caregivers and family; unclear financial incentive for providers; insufficient standardization, risk management, and quality control (expressed mainly by hospital representatives); and limited on-site testing, imaging, and telemonitoring (mainly expressed by HMO representatives). Conclusions. To increase use of AHaH, further development of on-site testing, imaging, telemonitoring, standards, and financial planning is needed. Research regarding quality and quantity, mid- and long-term medical implications, caregiver implications, and long-term systemic financial implications is required. Evaluating the fit between AHaH service provider (hospital/outsourced/HMO), patient group, and diagnosis is advised.

Health & Social Care in the Community
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate12%
Submission to final decision140 days
Acceptance to publication17 days
CiteScore3.300
Journal Citation Indicator0.770
Impact Factor2.4
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Article of the Year Award: Impactful research contributions of 2022, as selected by our Chief Editors. Discover the winning articles.