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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2 (1994), Issue 4, Pages 171-178
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/S1064744994000608
Clinical Study

Novel Family of Gynecologic Cancer Antigens Detected by Anti-HIV Antibody

1University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 600 South 42nd Street, Omaha, NE 68198-3255, USA
2Eppley Cancer Institute, Omaha, NE, USA

Received 7 June 1994; Accepted 17 August 1994

Copyright © 1994 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective: The reactivity of gynecologic cancer proteins with monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against the human immunodeficiency virus I (HIV-I) was tested.

Methods: Cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins, extracted from a broad range of gynecologic cancers obtained during standard surgical procedures, were tested in Western blotting with MAb 5023 developed against the amino acid sequences 308–322 of the envelope protein gp120 of HIV-I.

Results: Three cell membrane proteins, Mrl20,000 (p120), Mr41,000 (p41), and Mr24,000 (p24), and one chromatin protein, Mr24,000 (p24), were detected by MAb 5023 in invasive, poorly differentiated cervical squamous-cell carcinoma; ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma; poorly and well-differentiated endometrial carcinoma; vulvar squamous-cell carcinoma; and malignant mixed müllerian tumor. The same antigens were identified in cervical carcinoma cell line SiHa. Neither p120 nor p24 was recognized by other MAbs directed against the variable loop of gp120. Antigens p120 and p41 were undetectable in normal ovarian tissue and in biopsy samples of normal vaginal and rectal mucosa. Rectosigmoid cancer as well as colon carcinoma, lung carcinoma, and melanoma cell lines all tested negative.

Conclusions: The identified antigens may represent either the products of human genes (proto-onc-ogenes) or, more likely, the products of an unknown virus specifically expressed in female cancer.