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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 4, Issue 6, Pages 329-332
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/S106474499600066X

Role of Genital Mycoplasmas in Bacteremia: Should We Be Routinely Culturing for These Organisms?

Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital, Carlton 3053, Victoria, Australia

Received 30 January 1996; Accepted 14 January 1997

Copyright © 1996 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the genital mycoplasmas Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum as causes of bacteremia in a tertiary referral obstetrical, gynecological, and neonatal intensive care facility, over a period of 12 years from 1983 to 1994 inclusively.

Methods: All clinically significant blood cultures were reviewed and the percentage of septicemic episodes for genital mycoplasmas was compared to the total isolation rate, including conventional bacteria.

Results: The overall positivity rate for all pathogenic organisms isolated from the blood cultures of infants ranged from 4.5% to 7.7% per annum. U. urealyticum represented 0.8% of these positive isolates and M. hominis 0.4%. For adults, the overall positivity rate from blood cultures ranged from 6.5% to 13.5%, with U. urealyticum representing 9.6% of these positive isolates and M. hominis 9.9%.

Conclusions: With M. hominis having an established role in such clinical entities as postabortal and postpartum fever and U. urealyticum strongly implicated with chronic lung disease in low birth weight infants, it is appropriate to examine blood cultures for genital mycoplasmas in an obstetric institution.