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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 42967, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/IDOG/2006/42967
Clinical Study

Awareness of Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology Among Residents and Residency Directors

1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
2Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
3Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center, University Drive C, Pittsburgh, PA 15240, USA
4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, MetroHealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44109-1998, USA
5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA

Received 10 July 2006; Revised 25 August 2006; Accepted 13 September 2006

Copyright © 2006 Richard H. Beigi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Awareness of the subspecialty of infectious diseases in obstetrics and gynecology is low among United States residents and residency directors. Objective. Given the burden of infectious diseases on women's health, we sought to assess current awareness, interest, and perceived value of the subspecialty of infectious diseases in obstetrics and gynecology among current United States obstetrics and gynecology residents and residency directors. Methods. Two separate surveys addressing awareness, perceived value and interest in the subspecialty were sent to (1) a random 20% sample of obstetrics and gynecology residents and (2) all obstetrics and gynecology residency directors. Results. Seventy percent of the residency directors were familiar with the subspecialty and 67.0% placed value on infectious disease specialists in an academic department. Thirty percent of the residents reported awareness of the subspecialty. Thirty-six percent of residency directors reported that medical infectious disease specialists deliver formal education to the obstetrics and gynecology residents. Conclusion. United States obstetrics and gynecology residents and residency directors have a low awareness of the subspecialty. An open niche exists for formal education of residents in infectious diseases in obstetrics and gynecology by department specialists. These findings can be incorporated into ongoing recruitment efforts for the subspecialty of infectious diseases in obstetrics and gynecology.