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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2008, Article ID 840948, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/840948
Research Article

Infection with Hepatitis C Virus among HIV-Infected Pregnant Women in Thailand

1Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, USA
2Thailand MOPH-U.S. CDC Collaboration, CDC, Nonthaburi 11000, Thailand
3Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol Univeristy, Siriraj, Bangkoknoi, Bangkok 10700, Thailand
4Division of Viral Hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
5Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health, Department of Medical Services, Ministry of Public Health, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
6Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 1A8
7Department of Medical Services, Rajavithi Hospital, Ministry of Public Health (MOPH), Bangkok 10400, Thailand
8Global AIDS Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA

Received 5 March 2008; Revised 28 June 2008; Accepted 3 November 2008

Academic Editor: Daniel Landers

Copyright © 2008 Denise J. Jamieson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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