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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 216217, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/216217
Research Article

Maternal Vitamin D, Folate, and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Status and Bacterial Vaginosis during Pregnancy

1Department of Family & Preventive Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
3Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
4Perinatal Research Center, Women’s Health Research and Education Foundation, Nashville, TN 37203-1538, USA
5Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Perinatal Research, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX 77555-1062, USA

Received 22 August 2011; Accepted 25 October 2011

Academic Editor: Michael G. Gravett

Copyright © 2011 Anne L. Dunlop et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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