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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3281975, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3281975
Research Article

Influenza Vaccination among Pregnant Women: Patient Beliefs and Medical Provider Practices

1Research Department, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20024, USA
2Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, 1111 Augusta Drive, Houston, TX 77057, USA
3Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Albany Medical Center, 391 Myrtle Avenue, Suite 2, Albany, NY 12208, USA
4The University of Chicago Medicine, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 2050, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
5Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Geisinger Health System, 100 N Academy Avenue, Danville, PA 17822, USA
6Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Albany Medical Center, 391 Myrtle Avenue, 2nd floor, MC 74, Albany, NY 12208, USA
7American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20024, USA

Received 11 February 2016; Accepted 28 June 2016

Academic Editor: Bryan Larsen

Copyright © 2016 Lauren M. Stark et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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