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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2016, Article ID 5429316, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5429316
Research Article

Factors Associated with Hormonal and Intrauterine Contraceptive Use among HIV-Infected Men and Women in Lilongwe, Malawi: A Cross-Sectional Study

1UNC Project-Malawi, Kamuzu Central Hospital, 100 Mzimba Road, Private Bag Box A-104, Lilongwe, Malawi
2University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 101 Manning Drive, CB No. 7570, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7570, USA
3The Lighthouse Trust, Kamuzu Central Hospital, 100 Mzimba Road, Lilongwe, Malawi
4University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3368, USA
5The International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 75006 Paris, France
6Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Emory University, 49 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA

Received 19 May 2016; Accepted 25 July 2016

Academic Editor: Maria Gallo

Copyright © 2016 Jennifer H. Tang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Understanding the factors associated with the use of hormonal and intrauterine contraception among HIV-infected men and women may lead to interventions that can help reduce high unintended pregnancy rates. Materials and Methods. This study is a subanalysis of a cross-sectional survey of 289 women and 241 men who were sexually active and HIV-infected and were attending HIV care visits in Lilongwe, Malawi. We estimated adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) to evaluate factors associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use for men and women in separate models. Results and Discussion. 39.8% of women and 33.2% of men () reported that they were using hormonal or intrauterine contraception at last intercourse. Having greater than 3 children was the only factor associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use among men. Among women, younger age, not wanting a pregnancy in 2 years, being with their partner for more than 4 years, and being able to make family planning decisions by themselves were associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use. Conclusions. The men and women in our study population differed in the factors associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use. Understanding these differences may help decrease unmet FP needs among HIV-infected men and women.