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International Journal of Agronomy
Volume 2016, Article ID 6463826, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6463826
Research Article

Phytotoxicity and Benzoxazinone Concentration in Field Grown Cereal Rye (Secale cereale L.)

1Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
2Avoca, Inc., P.O. Box 129, 841 Avoca Farm Road, Merry Hill, NC 27957, USA
3Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
4Department of Crop Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
5USDA-ARS, Natural Products Utilization Research Unit, University, MS 38677, USA

Received 5 October 2015; Revised 8 December 2015; Accepted 10 December 2015

Academic Editor: Othmane Merah

Copyright © 2016 C. La Hovary et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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