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International Journal of Agronomy
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8219356, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8219356
Research Article

Quick Decline Disease Disturbs the Levels of Important Phytochemicals and Minerals in the Stem Bark of Mango (Mangifera indica)

1Department of Biochemistry, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800, Pakistan
2Department of Biosciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 45550, Pakistan
3Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100, Pakistan

Received 9 November 2015; Revised 27 February 2016; Accepted 7 March 2016

Academic Editor: Manuel Tejada

Copyright © 2016 Abdul Saeed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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