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International Journal of Agronomy
Volume 2017, Article ID 7315351, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7315351
Review Article

Genome Editing in Plants: An Overview of Tools and Applications

1Center of Genomics and Bioinformatics, Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Uzbekistan, University Street-2, Qibray Region, 111215 Tashkent, Uzbekistan
2Dow AgroSciences LLC, Indianapolis, IN 46268, USA
3Western Kentucky University-Owensboro, Owensboro, KY 42303, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Ibrokhim Y. Abdurakhmonov; ten.icszu@scimoneg

Received 20 April 2017; Accepted 28 May 2017; Published 3 July 2017

Academic Editor: Kent Burkey

Copyright © 2017 Venera S. Kamburova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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