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International Journal of Agronomy
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9731212, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9731212
Research Article

Soil Metals and Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Associated with American Chestnut Hybrids as Reclamation Trees on Formerly Coal Mined Land

1Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University, Poulsbo, WA 98225, USA
2Environmental Sciences, University of Washington, Tacoma, WA 98402, USA
3Department of Biology, Miami University, 114 Levey Hall, Middletown, OH 45042, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to J. M. Bauman; ude.uww@namuab.esinej

Received 28 July 2017; Accepted 17 October 2017; Published 19 December 2017

Academic Editor: Maria Serrano

Copyright © 2017 J. M. Bauman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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