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International Journal of Analytical Chemistry
Volume 2010, Article ID 278078, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/278078
Research Article

Quantitation by Portable Gas Chromatography: Mass Spectrometry of VOCs Associated with Vapor Intrusion

1Department of Chemistry, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA 15701, USA
2Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
3INFICON, Inc., 2 Technology Place, East Syracuse, NY 13057, USA

Received 6 July 2010; Revised 24 August 2010; Accepted 31 August 2010

Academic Editor: Hian Kee Lee

Copyright © 2010 Justin D. Fair et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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