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International Journal of Analytical Chemistry
Volume 2015, Article ID 284071, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/284071
Research Article

Total Phenolic, Flavonoid, Tomatine, and Tomatidine Contents and Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Extracts of Tomato Plant

1Departamento de Biotecnología y Ciencias Alimentarias, Instituto Tecnológico de Sonora, 5 de Febrero 818 Sur, 85000 Ciudad Obregon, SON, Mexico
2Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Sonora, Campus Cajeme, Boulevard Bordo Nuevo, Ejido Providencia, 85040 Cajeme, SON, Mexico
3Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo A.C., Avenida Río Conchos S/N, Parque Industrial, 31570 Cuauhtémoc, CHIH, Mexico
4Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Colonia Centro, 83000 Hermosillo, SON, Mexico
5Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo A.C., Carretera a la Victoria, 83000 Hermosillo, SON, Mexico

Received 26 June 2015; Revised 21 August 2015; Accepted 12 October 2015

Academic Editor: I. Schechter

Copyright © 2015 Norma Patricia Silva-Beltrán et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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