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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2009, Article ID 951548, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2009/951548
Review Article

Mitochondria, Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's Disease

Department of Neuroscience, Neurological Clinic, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56126 Pisa, Italy

Received 30 March 2009; Accepted 22 June 2009

Academic Editor: Patrizia Mecocci

Copyright © 2009 M. Mancuso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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