International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
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The Development and Psychometric Validation of a Comprehensive Measure Assessing Fear of Incompetence among Adults Who Have a Family Member with Dementia

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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of Alzheimer's disease.

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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Knowledge regarding Alzheimer’s Disease among College Students of Kathmandu, Nepal

Introduction. Alzheimer’s, a neurodegenerative disease, is becoming a growing burden and the leading cause of disability among older people, and there is no cure for it. It is set to be the biggest killer among the growing elderly population. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease among college students in Kathmandu metropolitan city. Methods. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study among 385 randomly selected bachelor students of Kathmandu metropolitan city. The questionnaire included 2 sections. Section I addressed the sociodemographic characteristics of the participants. Section II addressed or covered the Alzheimer’s Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS) test. ADKS contains a set of 30 items, with true and false options. 1 point was given for the correct answer and 0 for the incorrect answer. The final sum was then the total score of the participant. Frequency, percentage, mean, and standard deviation were calculated, and the chi-square test was used to measure the association between two categorical variables. Results. The mean ADKS (Alzheimer’s Disease Knowledge Scale) score is with the lowest and highest mean total scores of 8 and 26, respectively. 49.5% of the respondents scored above the mean. The number of male and female respondents who scored above the mean is 68 and 95, respectively, with value 0.71 and odds ratio 0.922. There is no association between gender and knowledge level. Gender seemed to have no effect on the knowledge about Alzheimer’s disease on the basis of the Alzheimer’s Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS). However, science students had comparatively better knowledge about disease than management students. The mean score of science and management is 15.9 and 15.04, respectively, with value 0.004. There is association between knowledge score and faculty. Conclusion. This study concluded that the knowledge level of college students on Alzheimer’s disease is below moderate. The findings concluded that there is association between faculty and knowledge score.

Research Article

Physician Perceptions about the Barriers to Prompt Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

Prior studies have identified numerous barriers to the prompt diagnosis of patients with suspected Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The aim of the study was to evaluate physician’s perceptions of the importance of previously identified barriers to diagnosis, but with a specific focus on the presentation of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which may be indicative of neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. A second aim was to evaluate how the perspective of primary care physicians (PCPs) may differ from that of specialists. A cross-sectional online survey of PCPs and specialists who routinely manage patients with complaints of age-related cognitive impairment was conducted. Participants were asked to identify barriers to prompt diagnosis from prespecified lists of known diagnostic challenges categorized into 4 domains: patient-related, physician-related, setting-related, and those relating to the clinical profile of AD. Physicians report a range of barriers when attempting to diagnose MCI and AD. Major themes included patients seeing cognitive decline as a normal part of aging and not disclosing symptoms, long waiting lists, and a lack of treatment options and definitive biomarker tests. Generally, PCPs and specialists showed broad agreement; however, PCPs were more likely to identify burdens on the healthcare system, such as long waiting lists and inadequate time to evaluate patients. Substantial barriers continue to hinder early diagnosis of MCI and AD. There are numerous areas where improvements might be made but the implementation of potential interventions will likely be associated with financial strain for many healthcare systems.

Research Article

Alzheimer’s Disease Frontal Cortex Mitochondria Show a Loss of Individual Respiratory Proteins but Preservation of Respiratory Supercomplexes

Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of sporadic dementia of in adults, shows increased risk of occurrence with aging and is destined to become a major sociomedical tragedy over the next few decades. Although likely complex in origin, sporadic AD is characterized by a progressive and stereotyped neuropathology with aggregated protein deposition (esp beta amyloid (BA) and hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau)) and neuronal degeneration. To date, prevention of BA synthesis or immune-mediated removal of BA has failed to alter AD progression. Development and testing of P-tau therapeutics are a work in progress. AD brain tissues show multiple system deficits, including loss of respiratory capacity. In the present study there were no differences in mitochondrial mass between AD and CTL samples. We examined mitochondrial preparations of postmortem AD and CTL frontal cortex for relative levels of individual respiratory protein complexes by Western immunoblotting. ANOVA revealed deficiencies of all respiratory complex subunits in AD; post-ANOVA t-testing revealed significant differences in levels of subunits for complexes II, III, and V, borderline significance for subunit of complex IV, and no difference for subunit of complex I. We also examined mitochondrial extracts with blue-native gel electrophoresis combined with immunoblotting for subunits of complexes I and III to search for “respiratory supercomplexes” (RSC’s). We found that levels of RSC’s did not differ between AD and CTL samples. Mitochondrial preparations from end-stage AD brain tissue showed loss of individual ATP-producing respiration subunits but preservation of levels of assembled respiratory subunits into RSC’s. Possible explanations include insufficient sensitivity of our method of RSC detection to find loss of individual subunits, or normal levels of RSC’s in AD brain mitochondria coupled with decreased levels of nonassembled respiratory complex subunits. Disease-altering therapies of early AD could include stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome loss of respiratory subunits.

Research Article

Physician Practice Patterns Associated with Diagnostic Evaluation of Patients with Suspected Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

The diagnostic process for patients presenting with cognitive decline and suspected dementia is complex. Physicians face challenges distinguishing between normal aging, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, and other dementias. Although there is some evidence for improving attitudes towards the importance of prompt diagnosis, there is limited information describing how physicians approach this diagnostic challenge in practice. This was explored in the present study. Across-sectional survey of primary care and specialist physicians, in 5 European countries, Canada, and the United States, was conducted. Participants were asked about their use of cognitive screening tools and diagnostic technologies, as well as the rationales and barriers for use. In total, 1365 physicians participated in the survey, 63% of whom were specialists. Most physicians stated they use objective cognitive tools to aid the early detection of suspected mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease in patients. The Mini-Mental State Examination was the most common tool used for initial screening; respondents cited speed and ease of use but noted its lack of specificity. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker and amyloid positron emission tomography tests, respectively, had been used by only 26% and 32% of physicians in the preceding 6 months, although patterns of use varied across countries. The most commonly cited reasons for not ordering such tests were invasiveness (for cerebrospinal fluid biomarker testing) and cost (for amyloid positron emission tomography imaging). Data reported by physicians reveal differences in the approaches to the diagnostics process in Alzheimer’s. A higher proportion of primary care physicians in the United States are routinely incorporating cognitive assessment tools into annual visits, but this is due to country differences in clinical practice. The value of screening tools and regular use could be discussed further with physicians; however, lack of specificity associated with cognitive tools and the investment required from patients and the healthcare system are limiting factors.

Research Article

Alzheimer’s Disease Mortality according to Socioeconomic Factors: Country Study

Aim of the paper is to quantify effects of socioeconomic factors on Alzheimer’s Disease Mortality in the Slovak Republic. We applied potential gains in life expectancy (PGLE) method to measure the impact of elimination of Alzheimer’s disease on life expectance in Slovak regions. PGLE is based on life table adjustment according to elimination of mortality caused by specific diagnosis. Our dataset consists of all deceased from Slovak Republic from 2001 to 2015. We analyse the impact of unemployment rate, GDP per capita, average wage, and education on life expectance in Slovak regions. To estimate that impact, ordinary least squares (OLS) is applied. According to our model, gross domestic product, average wage, and education influence mortality caused by Alzheimer’s disease.

Review Article

Immunosenescence of Natural Killer Cells, Inflammation, and Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) represents the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. Although the aetiology of AD is not clear, both environmental factors and heritable predisposition may contribute to disease occurrence. In addition, inflammation and immune system alterations have been linked to AD. The prevailing hypothesis as cause of AD is the deposition in the brain of amyloid beta peptides (Aβ). Although Aβ have a role in defending the brain against infections, their accumulation promotes an inflammatory response mediated by microglia and astrocytes. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins and complement factors favours the recruitment of peripheral immune cells further promoting neuroinflammation. Age-related inflammation and chronic infection with herpes virus such as cytomegalovirus may also contribute to inflammation in AD patients. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells involved in host defence against viral infections and tumours. Once activated NK cells secrete cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α and chemokines and exert cytotoxic activity against target cells. In the elderly, changes in NK cell compartment have been described which may contribute to the lower capacity of elderly individuals to respond to pathogens and tumours. Recently, the role of NK cells in the immunopathogenesis of AD is discussed. Although in AD patients the frequency of NK cells is not affected, a high NK cell response to cytokines has been described together with NK cell dysregulation of signalling pathways which is in part involved in this altered behaviour.

International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision-
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CiteScore2.610
Impact Factor-
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