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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2010, Article ID 978182, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/978182
Review Article

Biological Markers and Alzheimer Disease: A Canadian Perspective

Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Centre for Neurotranslational Research, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, 3755 Cote St. Catherine Rd. Montreal, QC, H3T 1E2, Canada

Received 16 February 2010; Accepted 11 July 2010

Academic Editor: Lucilla Parnetti

Copyright © 2010 Hyman M. Schipper. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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