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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 129753, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/129753
Review Article

Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β: A Mediator of Inflammation in Alzheimer's Disease?

1Department of Neurobiology, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland
2Department of Oncology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio, Finland

Received 7 February 2011; Accepted 4 March 2011

Academic Editor: Peter Crouch

Copyright © 2011 Jari Koistinaho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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