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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 154325, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/154325
Research Article

Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

1Institute of Developmental Genetics, Helmholtz Centre Munich, German Research Centre for Environmental Health (GmbH), Technical University Munich, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Munich 85764, Neuherberg, Germany
2DZNE, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Schillerstraße 44, 80336 Munich, Germany
3Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Helmholtz Centre Munich, German Research Centre for Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Munich 85764, Neuherberg, Germany
4Clinical Cooperation Group Molecular Neurogenetics, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Kraepelinstraße, 2-10, 80804 Munich, Germany

Received 21 December 2010; Accepted 15 February 2011

Academic Editor: Jeff Kuret

Copyright © 2011 Regina Augustin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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