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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 326320, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/326320
Review Article

Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

1Sri Sathya Sai Medical, Educational and Research Foundation, Prashanthi Nilayam 40, Kovai Thirunagar Coimbatore 641014, India
2323 Brock Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M6K 2M6
3Somnogen Inc., College Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M6H 1C5
4Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 1R8
5Departamento de Docencia e Investigación, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina, Avenida Alicia Moreau de Justo 1500, 4° Piso, 1107 Buenos Aires, Argentina
6Departamento de Fisiologia, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1121 Buenos Aires, Argentina

Received 28 November 2010; Accepted 2 March 2011

Academic Editor: B. J. Bacskai

Copyright © 2011 Venkatramanujam Srinivasan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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