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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 428970, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/428970
Review Article

Yeast as a Model System to Study Tau Biology

Laboratory of Functional Biology, Catholic University of Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 31, 3001 Heverlee, Belgium

Received 7 December 2010; Accepted 21 January 2011

Academic Editor: Jeff Kuret

Copyright © 2011 Ann De Vos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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