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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012, Article ID 489428, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/489428
Review Article

Apolipoprotein E: Essential Catalyst of the Alzheimer Amyloid Cascade

1Department of Molecular Medicine, Suncoast Gerontology Center, Johnnie B. Byrd Sr. Alzheimer’s Institute, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
2Department of Neurology and Linda Crnic Institute for Downs Syndrome, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Aurora, CO 80045, USA
3Departments of Neurology, Pathology, and Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA

Received 16 December 2011; Accepted 23 April 2012

Academic Editor: Laura Morelli

Copyright © 2012 Huntington Potter and Thomas Wisniewski. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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