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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012, Article ID 630182, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/630182
Review Article

Amyloid Beta and Tau Proteins as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment: Rethinking the Current Strategy

1Le Groupe de Recherche sur le Système Nerveux Central, Département de Physiologie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
2Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Department of Psychiatry, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
3UTSA Neurosciences Institute and Department of Biology, College of Sciences, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
4Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA

Received 7 October 2011; Accepted 18 November 2011

Academic Editor: Paula Moreira

Copyright © 2012 Siddhartha Mondragón-Rodríguez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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