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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012, Article ID 786494, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/786494
Review Article

Ocular Manifestations of Alzheimer’s Disease in Animal Models

1Glaucoma & Retinal Neurodegeneration Research Group, Visual Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London EC1V 9EL, UK
2Sutton Eye Unit, Epsom and St. Helier NHS Trust, Cotswold Road, Sutton, Surry, London, UK
3St. Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London, UK
4Western Eye Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare Trust, London, UK

Received 28 January 2012; Accepted 11 March 2012

Academic Editor: Ashley I. Bush

Copyright © 2012 Miles Parnell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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