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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 150628, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/150628
Research Article

The Association between Apolipoprotein E Gene Polymorphism and Mild Cognitive Impairment among Different Ethnic Minority Groups in China

1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan 750004, China
2Department of Comprehensive Medicine, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan 750004, China
3Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia

Received 8 May 2014; Revised 2 July 2014; Accepted 16 July 2014; Published 5 August 2014

Academic Editor: Lucilla Parnetti

Copyright © 2014 ZhiZhong Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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