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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2014, Article ID 836748, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/836748
Research Article

Playing a Musical Instrument as a Protective Factor against Dementia and Cognitive Impairment: A Population-Based Twin Study

1Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, 3715 McClintock Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0191, USA
2Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1061, USA
3Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 3 July 2014; Accepted 13 November 2014; Published 2 December 2014

Academic Editor: Francesco Panza

Copyright © 2014 M. Alison Balbag et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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