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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 515248, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/515248
Review Article

Alzheimer’s Disease: Exploring the Role of Inflammation and Implications for Treatment

Yampa Valley Medical Associates, 940 Central Park Drive, Steamboat Springs, CO 80487, USA

Received 31 August 2015; Accepted 21 October 2015

Academic Editor: Francesco Panza

Copyright © 2015 Mark E. McCaulley and Kira A. Grush. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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